Vampirism now a sub-culture of Austin

By Emily Alleman (Photos), Frances Bello, Rachel Perlmutter and Shawna Reding

Austinites gather at the disco-lit Elysium on October 19 for their 2nd annual Vampire Ball.

Austinites gather at the disco-lit Elysium on October 19 for their 2nd annual Vampire Ball.

Among the many activities Austinites partake in during their spare time, Vampirism is gaining popularity after the second annual Austin Vampire Ball.

In the last two decades, vampire books and movies have become extremely popular. With the popularity, vampire culture has exploded, inspiring everything from role playing games to varied stories exploring different facets of the vampire myth.

However, the part of vampire culture that is rarely explored is those who have embraced the vampire name to describe themselves and what they believe. Many have formed “vampire courts” all over the country, including in Austin. October 19, the Vampire Court of Austin celebrated their one-year anniversary of being an official vampire court at the 2nd Annual Austin Vampire Ball.

The Vampire Court of Austin became an official vampire court a year ago when they traveled to New Orleans and were accepted by the vampires of the world as a true vampire court. The court was first started over two years ago when Logan South was elected the first King in more than 10 years. In the past year, the vampire court has continued to grow and helped to bring in even more people the vampire ball.

Logan South and Daley Catherine are the King and Queen of the Austin Vampire Court and the founders of the local Vampire Ball.

Logan South and Daley Catherine are the King and Queen of the Austin Vampire Court and the founders of the local Vampire Ball.

“Austin Vampire Court has grown so much over the past year, we now have 40 plus members.” Daley Catherine, the vampire queen of the court, said. “So this ball has become a lot more than it was last year.”

Logan South, the king of the local vampire court, said he never had met such an receptive and unique group of vampires before he moved to Austin, even in his hometown of Dallas. With his company “Nocturnity,” an event company which became a vampire safe haven, and Catherine a group began to form, eventually becoming the Austin Vampire court.

Catherine claims that she can’t imagine the vampire ball and the vampire court being more accepted or popular in any other city.

“Austin is very open-minded—they’re very diverse. We have a lot of people here who are very accepting of different cultures.” Catherine explains. “I definitely can’t imagine [the ball] being this awesome in any other city.”

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That is one of the reasons why they give back to the city through blood drives, inspired by a humorous Geico Insurance commercial. In fact, just before the Austin Vampire Ball, they had huge blood drive to promote their event and the importance of donating blood.

With these events, South says he wants to not only to spread the world about the vampire community, but help Austin also become a hub for the all vampires.

“We want Austin to be synonymous with vampires — I mean, it’s synonymous with bats, so why not have this in the city also?”

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[Package published on Multimedia Newsroom in October 2013. ]

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